Thank you to Anna Mae on Den of Angels for this response to a comment that people need to buy bootlegged dolls because only Volks and Soom dolls will get you respect in this hobby.

_______________________________________________________________

If you genuinely feel you need a SOOM or Volks to be respected then I think the community holding hands with you isn’t going to do much good, but maybe a psychiatrist will. Substituting that wanted brandname-doll with a stolen one shows a further immature inability to think past your own ego: I need an EXPENSIVE doll to be respected, if I cannot afford it then I’m going to steal it! 
Really? Wow.

In this thinking the doll seems to have become something that is ‘only’ valued for being a certain brand. But it does explain why beautiful but cheaper dolls aren’t good enough for the recast-buyer. Because what matters is not the doll or the enjoyment of it (I’m not even going to touch on the subject of the artist and his/her livelyhood here), but some brand-related ego-stuff like thinking you can make someone envious or feeling special or ‘respected’ for owning a doll that looks like a certain brand. Talk about elitist.

Iplehouse have released a full statement with their stance on fake dolls and urging their customers to help them.

_______________________________


Hi, this is Iplehouse.

Today we want to ask you a favor.
Recently we received information from some of our clients that fake Iplehouse doll is being distributed in the market. Real Iplehouse dolls are only sold on Iplehouse site. So please be aware of this and do not buy Iplehouse dolls from other sites.

Especially please don¡¯t buy counterfeit dolls. If you find some sites which sells our dolls cheaper than our site, you can assume that it is a fake.

If you continue to buy these forged dolls, it will affect our creativity and eventually it will affect our company fundamentally.

A lot of doll manufacturing companies are facing hard time because of these illegal products. And Iplehouse is not an exception.

Iplehouse is organized by few artistes. Most of our staffs engage in creative work and we appreciate our clients love for our dolls. We give careful attention to our client¡¯s need. Also from the planning stage to the end we try our best to make an adorable doll which will be loved by our customers. All of our dolls are made of our effort, toil and passion. Please don¡¯t fill criminal¡¯s pocket with money by buying fake products.

We need your support and help to develop new products. Developing a new product consumes a lot of time and money. Please understand this and once again we sincerely ask you not to purchase those illegal products.

And please prevent other friends around from purchasing illegal items. We are planning to conduct a campaign against illegal counterfeit items. Please join us with this campaign.

We need your love and support. Please give us strength.

Thank you for your time and support.

We will do our utmost to develop new products and design to give satisfaction and joy to our clients.
Iplehouse will make your dreams come true.

(Source: iplehouse.net)

Here is a reply from Fairyland, the company who produce the dolls sculpted by Cerberus Project. Hope you find it as enlightening as I do.

"Thank you for your interest in our FairyLand dolls and here is the translated reply from one of our administrator. He would like to let you know that this does not represent the views of FairyLand but his own view as an administrator.

" Contrary to popular belief that FairyLand is a big company, we are a fairly small company that operates in an industry which requires intensive hours of labour (This also applies to any other bjd companies in the field). We would like to let our customers know that despite what seems like an expensive price tag for a doll, there isn’t much profit we earn buy selling one. Higher quality materials, used to make bjds are outrageously expensive which makes the marginally small profit even smaller. 

We understand reasons why some customers would prefer copied products over originals. However, the longer the trend of buying copied products prevails and the more profit recasting producers make, original companies will be deeply affected by the impact and will start to question why should we even develop a new product. This will eventually lead original sculptors to close down the business or to make a very few quantity of goods for exclusive selected number of people. Naturally, the chain of events will impact the copiers to close down the business as well as there won’t be any more new products to be copied and sold. If these cycle of events were to take place repetitively, customers buying original goods will be deeply affected as well since the market would have reduced in its size and quality over time. Here, I have taken an example from a different industry to illustrate my point and there can be a differences in knowing whether you are buying with or without knowing. Nevertheless, most certainly (uncontrollable) demands of customers will take part in completing this vicious cycle. 

The problem might seem far off from the argument whether copy (acts of copying and buying copied goods) is legitimate or not but actually it has everything to do with it. A significant amount of time and money is spent when developing a new line or releasing a new product. Copied goods are always cheaper (than original goods) since there is no need for copiers to spend time and money in development. Let’s assume if they were to have their own method and make moderate changes for development but had it copied by another copy-company. How would they feel and who will be there to recognise and respect their rights? Your rights are not likely to be recognised if you have been ignoring others’ rights. Regardless of the size of the company (and how much profit it earns) which produces original good, I oppose the argument that copy is legitimate and I hesitate to use the word ‘recast’. Copy is copy, and you cannot call it legitimate or legal. The need of legitimation of copying goods already reveals the fact that consumers buying copied goods feeling guilty of their actions. If the purchase was just, then it seems unlikely that you would have to make an effort to find reasons to justify your purchase. “ 

For your information, FairyLand is a small company based in Korea with not more than 20 or more employees at one time including administrative staffs. We have been working hard to create a fair and just working environment for our employees and aspiring to provide optimum working conditions that can set a new precedent in this industry. Cerberus Project TM is the sculpting team that sculpts and develop our dolls whilst FairyLand is responsible for all other tasks including administration. It is CP’s wish to remain as a team and not as a company to keep true to their origins (finding creative inspiration and joy from sculpting bjds) and FairyLand is pleased to be working as a partner for one of the oldest and finest sculpting team in ABJD community. We take pride in our name and quality of our work and will be disheartened to see the bjd community impoverish as a result of ‘copy’ problem. If you have any other questions or requests, please do not hesitate to ask. Thank you. 

Kind Regards,

FairyLand” 

"Most of our employees are artists and we are a small-scale company.

Also CEO is a sculptor and currently about 2-30 employees are working at our firm.

2-30 employees design and make the dolls and with some help from corporative firm we are manufacturing dolls.”

They have confirmed that the sculptor is the CEO, and that the dolls are made by a casting company. Would you still call this a big company?

Focus on Gentaro Araki (Unoa Sculptor.)
Araki-san is an illustrator and sculptor of art dolls, including the Unoa series of ball jointed dolls. Due to the high resale value, these dolls are a target for recasters. However, the dolls are still available direct from the company, through Noppin shop.The photo is showing the sculpting process of one of Araki-san’s larger art dolls. 
He has expressed distress at the sale of recasts (as well as stylistic copies, although this blog does not focus on that issue). You can read it here: http://unoa.fc2web.com/english.html#ploblem2
Although the English is not perfect, it does give an insight to the hurt he feels at his dolls being recast.

Focus on Gentaro Araki (Unoa Sculptor.)

Araki-san is an illustrator and sculptor of art dolls, including the Unoa series of ball jointed dolls. Due to the high resale value, these dolls are a target for recasters. However, the dolls are still available direct from the company, through Noppin shop.

The photo is showing the sculpting process of one of Araki-san’s larger art dolls. 

He has expressed distress at the sale of recasts (as well as stylistic copies, although this blog does not focus on that issue). You can read it here: http://unoa.fc2web.com/english.html#ploblem2

Although the English is not perfect, it does give an insight to the hurt he feels at his dolls being recast.

  1. Camera: CASIO COMPUTER CO.,LTD. EX-Z850
  2. Aperture: f/4
  3. Exposure: 1/160th
  4. Focal Length: 14mm

I had to remove the strong language, as I’m really trying to stop this blog turning into any kind of flame war. I’ll answer your main issue though:
 At least the ones for recasts serve an ACTUAL purpose, regardless of whether you agree with it.”

The purpose of this blog is to provide information about doll makers to help people make an informed decision about whether, or even which, recasts they want to buy.

People are being told that there is not a moral issue as the doll companies are making a fortune, and I would like those people to know the truth BEFORE they make their decision.

It is NOT intended to villify recast collecotrs, ONLY to help people make informed choices.

Welcome to Say No. It’s simply a place for people to put forward their arguments as to why they disagree with the buying of fake Ball Jointed Dolls.

It is not intended for any kind of abuse towards people who do buy bootlegged dolls. Lets keep things civil.